Bernie Morris

Seattle Metropolitans 1915-23
Forward – 5’7" – 145 lbs.

Awards/Honors

  • PCHA Goal Scoring Leader:  1916
  • PCHA Assist Leader:  1918
  • PCHA Scoring Leader:  1917
  • PCHA First Team All-Star:  1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1922
  • PCHA Second Team All-Star:  1921, 1923

Championships

  • PCHA League Championship:  1917, 1919
  • Stanley Cup Championship:  1917

 

Statistics

Regular Season Playoffs
GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1915-16 Seattle Metropolitans 18 23 9 32 27
1916-17 Seattle Metropolitans 24 37 17 54 17 4 14 2 16 0
1917-18 Seattle Metropolitans 18 20 12 32 9 2 1 0 1 0
1918-19 Seattle Metropolitans 20 22 7 29 15
1919-20 Seattle Metropolitans 5 0 2 2 0
1920-21 Seattle Metropolitans 22 11 13 24 3 2 1 0 1 0
1921-22 Seattle Metropolitans 24 14 10 24 36 2 0 0 0 0
1922-23 Seattle Metropolitans 29 21 5 26 30
Seattle Totals 155 148 73 221 137 15 16 4 20 0
NHL Totals 6 1 0 1 0

Bernie Morris turned pro with Victoria of the PCHA in 1914-15 before being traded (along with Bobby Rowe) to the new Seattle Metropolitans franchise prior to the start of the 1915-16 season for Harry Cameron, one of the six players who defected from Toronto of the NHA.  Morris found his scoring touch in Seattle, leading the league in goals during his first season with the Mets and in points the following year.  He etched his name in the history books with an incredible performance in the 1917 Stanley Cup Finals against the Montreal Canadiens by scoring 14 goals in four games, outscoring the entire Canadiens’ team for the series.  His six goals in game four are still a record for goals by a player in a finals game.

The 1918-19 season was the fourth consecutive in which Morris led the Mets in scoring, and confidence in Seattle was high going into the two games, total goals playoff with Vancouver for the right to play for the Stanley Cup.  A few hours before the start of the first game Bernie was informed that he was being sought by the authorities on charges of draft evasion.  He immediately turned himself in, figuring that it was just a misunderstanding that would be cleared up quickly.  He was wrong, and the subsequent investigation and court proceedings not only kept him out of the playoffs and 1919 Stanley Cup finals, but also resulted in his detention at Camp Lewis (now Fort Lewis) for almost a year, preventing him from taking the ice for the 1919-20 season.  His name was finally cleared in the spring of 1920, just in time to make the trip east with the Mets for the 1920 Stanley Cup finals against Ottawa.  Morris wasn’t in game shape, only earning two assists in five games as the Mets lost the series three games to two.

Morris had three more good seasons in Seattle before being traded to Calgary of the WCHL prior to the 1923-24 season.  He made a brief appearance with the Boston Bruins of the NHL in 1924-25 and retired from play in the spring of 1930.  In the mid-1930s he was a referee in the NWHL and the PCHL for games played in Seattle.  In his seven seasons in Seattle Morris led the team in scoring five times and was a league all-star every season.