Frank Foyston

Seattle Metropolitans 1915-24
Forward – 5’9" – 160 lbs.

Hockey Hall of Fame – 1958

Awards/Honors

  • PCHA Goal Scoring Leader:  1920, 1921
  • PCHA First Team All-Star:  1917, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1923, 1924
  • PCHA Second Team All-Star:  1919, 1922
  • PCHA MVP:  1917

Championships

  • PCHA League Championship:  1917, 1919, 1920
  • Stanley Cup Championship:  1917

Coaching

  • Seattle Sea Hawks (NWHL):  1933-37
  • Coaching Record:  73-54-15
  • NWHL Championship:  1936

 

Statistics

Regular Season Playoffs
GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1915-16 Seattle Metropolitans 18 9 4 13 6
1916-17 Seattle Metropolitans 24 36 12 48 51 4 7 3 10 3
1917-18 Seattle Metropolitans 13 9 5 14 9 2 0 0 0 3
1918-19 Seattle Metropolitans 18 15 4 19 0 7 12 1 13 10
1919-20 Seattle Metropolitans 22 26 3 29 3 7 9 1 10 7
1920-21 Seattle Metropolitans 23 26 4 30 10 2 1 0 1 0
1921-22 Seattle Metropolitans 24 16 7 23 25 2 0 0 0 3
1922-23 Seattle Metropolitans 30 20 8 28 21
1923-24 Seattle Metropolitans 30 17 6 23 8 2 1 0 1 0
Seattle Totals 202 174 53 227 133 26 30 5 35 26
NHL Totals 64 17 7 24 32

Frank Foyston had played three seasons as a professional in the NHA with Toronto (winning the Stanley Cup in 1914) before defecting to the new Seattle Metropolitans of the PCHA with the rest of his teammates in 1915.  He, along with Eddie Carpenter, Harry Holmes, Jack Walker and Cully Wilson formed the nucleus of the new team, leading the Mets to the Stanley Cup finals in only their second year (1917).  The best-of-five series against the Montreal Canadiens of the NHA was played in Seattle, and the home-town team took the series in four games to become the first US based team to win the Cup.  Foyston’s seven goals in the final were the second best total on the club behind the 14 scored by Bernie Morris.

The Mets appeared in the Stanley Cup finals two more times under the on-ice leadership of Foyston, playing to a draw in 1919 against Montreal and losing in five games to Ottawa in 1920.  Following the demise of the Mets after the 1923-24 season, he moved on to Victoria where he won his third Stanley Cup in 1925.  After two seasons playing for the Detroit Cougars of the NHL, Foyston spent some time as a referee and coach before returning to Seattle to take over as the manager of the Sea Hawks in 1933.  The club missed the playoffs in their first season and lost in the league finals to Vancouver in 1935, which led to Foyston’s dismissal.  When the Sea Hawks got off to a horrible start to the 1935-36 season, playing coach Art Gagne was released and Foyston was brought back into the fold.  The club went 17-7-6 over the remainder of the season and went on to win the NWHL championship, Seattle’s first pro title since 1917.  He stayed on with the Sea Hawks for one more season before retiring from hockey for good in 1937, spending his time operating a turkey farm.

Foyston holds almost all of the offensive franchise records for the Seattle Metropolitans, including games played, goals, and  points in both the regular season and playoffs.  He was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1958.